Body Treatment

Body wraps could be considered as the earliest known ‘spa treatment’. The ancient Egyptians were using a body wrap when they embalmed bodies using herbs, resins and spices. This practice preserved body tissues and prevented degradation and decay. Emollient wraps in modern day spas have the same aim; to fortify the skin and prevent pre-mature aging. Many soft-tissue conditions can benefit from wraps aimed at decreasing chronic holding patterns, stimulating circulation and lymphatic flow, or by simply relaxing the body and providing time for reflection. Today, a wide variety of body wraps are used for cosmetic purposes, or to treat conditions such as rheumatism, low immunity, fatigue, and muscular aches and pains. There are numerous ways to perform a body wrap, and as with any spa treatment, the therapist can mix and match methods to best meet their treatment goals. It is helpful to understand three different wrapping procedures; the hot sheet wrap, the ‘cocoon’ and the tension wrap. It is important to point out that the words ‘hot sheet wrap’ and ‘cocoon’ are used to differentiate two distinct procedures. This is a device to provide clarity and not meant to suggest that the word ‘wrap’ always means a hot sheet wrap, while the word ‘cocoon’ always means that the product is applied directly to the body. The words ‘wrap’, ‘cocoon’, ‘swathe’ ‘envelopment’, ‘envelop’ can all be used freely at the discretion of the therapist to describe any type of wrap.

It is important to point out that the words ‘hot sheet wrap’ and ‘cocoon’ are used to differentiate two distinct procedures. This is a device to provide clarity and not meant to suggest that the word ‘wrap’ always means a hot sheet wrap, while the word ‘cocoon’ always means that the product is applied directly to the body. The words ‘wrap’, ‘cocoon’, ‘swathe’ ‘envelopment’, ‘envelop’ can all be used freely at the discretion of the therapist to describe any type of wrap. The types of products that can be used in a hot sheet wrap or cocoon are limited only by the imagination. We will give you a brief description of some different treatments that are currently offered in the spa industry. We will provide an overview of some of the products that can be used with each type of wrap. As the reader can see, the products are often the same. The difference is in the way the product is prepared and the method that is used to wrap the client. Before delivering the treatments described in this body wrap the therapist may wish to review basic dry room equipment ), spa draping ), client positioning for product application), dry room and wet room removal techniques and exfoliation techniques
Body wraps could be considered as the earliest known ‘spa treatment’. The ancient Egyptians were using a body wrap when they embalmed bodies using herbs, resins and spices. This practice preserved body tissues and prevented degradation and decay. Emollient wraps in modern day spas have the same aim; to fortify the skin and prevent pre-mature aging. Many soft-tissue conditions can benefit from wraps aimed at decreasing chronic holding patterns, stimulating circulation and lymphatic flow, or by simply relaxing the body and providing time for reflection. Today, a wide variety of body wraps are used for cosmetic purposes, or to treat conditions such as rheumatism, low immunity, fatigue, and muscular aches and pains. There are numerous ways to perform a body wrap, and as with any spa treatment, the therapist can mix and match methods to best meet their treatment goals. It is helpful to understand three different wrapping procedures; the hot sheet wrap, the ‘cocoon’ and the tension wrap. It is important to point out that the words ‘hot sheet wrap’ and ‘cocoon’ are used to differentiate two distinct procedures. This is a device to provide clarity and not meant to suggest that the word ‘wrap’ always means a hot sheet wrap, while the word ‘cocoon’ always means that the product is applied directly to the body. The words ‘wrap’, ‘cocoon’, ‘swathe’ ‘envelopment’, ‘envelop’ can all be used freely at the discretion of the therapist to describe any type of wrap. The types of products that can be used in a hot sheet wrap or cocoon are limited only by the imagination. We will give you a brief description of some different treatments that are currently offered in the spa industry. We will provide an overview of some of the products that can be used with each type of wrap. As the reader can see, the products are often the same. The difference is in the way the product is prepared and the method that is used to wrap the client. Before delivering the treatments described in this body wrap the therapist may wish to review basic dry room equipment ), spa draping ), client positioning for product application), dry room and wet room removal techniques and exfoliation techniques